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Anna Kournikova’s very private life with superstar partner after walking from tennis.

Russian tennis player Anna Kournikova was one of the biggest stars in the world in the early 2000s.

She was the poster girl of world tennis, quite literally.

 

 

 

 

At one stage during the late 1990s and early 2000s, sporting sensation Anna Kournikova was on magazine covers, movie screens and catwalks. And some times on the courts of Wimbledon and Roland Garros, too.

She was the poster girl of world tennis, quite literally.

At one stage during the late 1990s and early 2000s, sporting sensation Anna Kournikova was on magazine covers, movie screens and catwalks. And some times on the courts of Wimbledon and Roland Garros, too.

She was, at one point, the most searched for image in the early days of search engine giant Google. It’s not hard to believe, either, given her movie star looks and celebrity status that saw her given the moniker of the “Spice Girls of tennis”, alongside playing partner Martina Hingis.

But whatever happened to her? Why did give up her career on the baseline at tender age of just 21? And what has she done since hanging up her tennis whites? Now 42, Kournikova lives a very different life to her early years.

Early life and tennis career
Kournikova was born in Moscow, Russia, in 1981. Her father was a professor at the University of Physical Culture and Sport in Moscow, while her mother was a 400-metre runner. Her half-brother, Allan was a talented youth golfer and continues to play today.

She first picked up a tennis racket aged five and by eight was appearing in youth tournaments. By age 10 she had been signed by a talent agency and moved to Florida to train at the world-renowned Nick Bollettieri tennis academy.

She quickly tore up the junior circuit and went professional in 1995. The next year she made the fourth round of the US Open and made her SW19 debut at age 16 – making it all the way to the semi-finals.

During her career, Kournikova found more success in doubles than singles, rising to the number-one ranking alongside Hingis, making her a household name in tennis circles and beyond.

However, at the turn of the millennium she began to experience a series of injury problems. A left foot stress fracture saw her miss 12 tournaments, which would continue to plague her progress on the international stage. In 2001 she was ranked No.74 in singles and No.26 in the world in doubles.

Back and abductor issues later impinged on her career and she dropped out of the top 300 tennis players in the world by the end of 2003. Unfortunately, she was forced to retire that year, just eight years after making her professional bow.

She did, however, reunite with Hingis in 2010 to participate in competitive tennis for the first time in seven years in the Invitational Ladies’ Doubles event at Wimbledon.

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